Speakers

Calum MacRae MD PhD

Calum MacRae MD PhD

Brigham and Women’s Hospital Harvard

Dr. Calum MacRae is the Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is also an Associate Member at the Broad Institute and a Principal Faculty Member at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. A cardiologist, geneticist and developmental biologist, he has trained in Edinburgh, London and Boston. He came to Harvard Medical School for a fellowship in cardiovascular genetics in 1991. He continued his research training at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1996 with focus on developmental biology. He returned to Brigham and Women’s in 2009 and rose to chief of cardiovascular medicine in 2014.
His research interest is in understanding the fundamental mechanisms of disease using human studies and complementary efforts combining systems level modeling with empiric high-throughput biology in the zebrafish. His lab uses automated screens in fish to define the genetic architecture of disease and to explore gene-drug (or environment) interactions through the interrogation of large-scale chemical libraries. His clinical interests include genomic medicine, innovation in phenotyping and the redesign of clinical care. Under his leadership, the Brigham Cardiology team has successfully engaged in a number of innovative collaborations in cardiovascular care optimization with a wide range of industry partners.
In October 2016, Dr. MacRae became the recipient of One Brave Idea, a $75 million 5-year research award to study coronary heart disease and its consequences. This unique team based program is funded by the American Heart Association, Verily and Astra Zeneca. His proposal was chosen amongst a group of 349 applicants from 22 countries who sought the project to identify an entirely new approach to eradicate the number one killer of Americans. His visionary approach holds promise for addressing a broad set of diseases.

Joseph Wu MD PhD

Joseph Wu MD PhD

Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

Joseph C. Wu, MD, PhD is Director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute and Simon H. Stertzer Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology at the Stanford School of Medicine. His lab works on biological mechanisms of patient-specific and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The main goals are to (i) understand basic cardiovascular disease mechanisms, (ii) accelerate drug discovery and screening, (iii) develop “clinical trial in a dish” concept, and (iv) implement precision cardiovascular medicine for prevention and treatment of patients.

Dr. Wu has received numerous prestigious awards, including Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Medical Scientists (2007), National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award (2008), NIH Roadmap Transformative Award (2009), American Heart Association Innovative Research Award (2009), Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers given out by President Obama (2010), AHA Established Investigator Award (2012), BWF Innovation in Regulatory Science Award (2015), and AHA Merit Award (2017). He also received the Best Basic Science Manuscript Award in Circulation twice (2006 & 2014), Best Manuscript Award in Circulation Research (2013), and the William Parmley outstanding paper award in JACC twice (2009 & 2017). In addition, he received the inaugural Joseph A. Vita Award (2015) at the AHA meeting which is given to an investigator whose body of work published in the last 5 years has had transformative impact on basic, translational, or clinical cardiovascular research.

Dan Roden MD

Dan Roden MD

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Dan Roden received his medical degree and trained in Internal Medicine at McGill University in Montreal. He then went to Vanderbilt where, after fellowships in Clinical Pharmacology and Cardiology, he joined the faculty, and has remained there since. For the past 30 + years, his clinical and research work focused on two broad areas: variability in response to drug therapy, and genetic and molecular mechanisms in cardiac arrhythmias. In 2006, he was tasked with the job of leading Vanderbilt’s growing programs in the broad area of Personalized Medicine. Under his leadership in the past decade, Vanderbilt has become nationally- and internationally-recognized for cutting edge programs in this area: these include BioVU, the largest single-site DNA collection in the world, and PREDICT, a program that puts genetic information on variable drug responses in patients’ electronic health records, and uses that information when certain drugs are prescribed. In the summer of 2016, the Personalized Medicine Program was awarded the largest grant in Vanderbilt history to create and manage the Data and Research Core for the 1,000,000-participant US national Precision Medicine Initiative.

Dr. Roden served as director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology (1992-2004). He has received the Leon Goldberg Young Investigator Award and the Rawls Palmer Progress in Science Award from the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics; the Distinguished Scientist Award and the Douglas Zipes lectureship from the Heart Rhythm Society; and the Distinguished Scientist Award and the inaugural Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Medal of Honor from the American Heart Association. He currently serves on the Advisory Council to the National Human Genome Research Institute and the Science Board of the FDA. He has been elected to membership in the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, and fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Louisa Jorm PhD

Louisa Jorm PhD

Centre for Big Data Research in Health, UNSW

Louisa Jorm is the Foundation Director of the Centre for Big Data Research in Health at UNSW Australia. She has spent equal periods in senior leadership roles in government and academia, giving her unique opportunities for translational research impacts.

Professor Jorm is an international leader in health “big data” research and specifically in applying advanced analytic methods to large-scale routinely collected data and linked data, including hospital inpatient, mortality, perinatal and medical and pharmaceutical claims data. She has made major scientific contributions to research in the areas of health system performance, health surveillance, data linkage and Aboriginal health. Professor Jorm has published >130 scientific papers and been awarded ~$20 million in research grants. She is a high-profile advocate for more and better use of routinely collected health data for research.

She has demonstrated a career commitment to putting evidence to work in policy and practice and her work has had numerous translational impacts, e.g.: driving changes to reporting of national health performance indicators; supporting the planning of community-based early childhood and aged care services; informing national guidelines for management of acute coronary syndrome in Indigenous people; and shaping national policy regarding access to publicly funded health data for research.

She has played a leading role in the establishment of major infrastructure and capacity for health big data research in Australia, including the NSW/ACT Centre for Health Record Linkage, the 45 and Up Study and the NSW Biostatistical Officer Training Program and the Secure Unified Research Environment (SURE).

She is a member of the Australian Health Ethics Committee, from 2010-2015 was a member of the NHMRC Research Committee and from 2013-2015 was a member of the NHMRC Prevention and Community Health Committee. She is a member of the Boards of the NSW Bureau of Health Information and Scientia Clinical Research.

Clara Chow MBBS FRACP PhD

Clara Chow MBBS FRACP PhD

The George Institute for Global Health

Professor Clara Chow is a clinician-scientist (Cardiologist), Professor of Medicine, University of Sydney and Program Director of Community Based Cardiac Services at Westmead Hospital. She also holds honorary posts as the Academic co-Director of the newly formed Charles Perkins Centre Westmead (2016), the co-lead of the Cardiovascular stream of the Sydney Health Partners Advanced Health Research & Translation Centre and Honorary Professorial Fellow at the George Institute. In the community, she currently co-Chairs the National Secondary Prevention Alliance, is on the Board and is Honorary Secretary of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
Prof. Chow has extensive experience in the design, development, management, analysis, interpretation and reporting of large-scale epidemiology and clinical trial studies. Her work in cardiovascular disease prevention is recognised both nationally and internationally. She has a PhD in cardiovascular epidemiology and international public health from the University of Sydney, and a Postdoc in Cardiac Imaging and Clinical trials and Epidemiology from McMaster University, Canada. She has been supported by the NHMRC through consecutive fellowships since her PhD and now holds a NHMRC CDF and National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship, Level 2 (2016-20).
Prof Chow’s research program is inspired to identify and evaluate simple and scalable strategies to prevent CVD. She leads the NHMRC-funded Quartet trial that is examining an innovative ultra-low dose combination therapy approach to blood pressure-lowering and currently leads a number digital health intervention trials. This includes the NHMRC-funded TEXTMEDS (TEXT messages to improve MEDication adherence and Secondary prevention), a multi-centre randomised to evaluate an innovative secondary prevention support program delivered via mobile phone text message. TEXTMEDS follows the TEXT ME (Tobacco Exercise and diet MEssages) randomised controlled trial www.text-me.net (JAMA. 2015;314(12):1255-1263) that won The most impactful publications in 2015, Award from Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Council of the American Heart Association. Prof. Chow’s team TextCare recently won the 2016 Google Impact Challenge Award.

Kim-Anh Lê Cao PhD

Kim-Anh Lê Cao PhD

Centre for Systems Genomics, University of Melbourne

Dr Kim-Anh Lê Cao graduated from her PhD in 2008 at the Université de Toulouse, France. She received an award for her PhD thesis in Applied Statistics by the French Statistical Society prize (triennial) in 2009. Soon after her graduation she moved to Australia and was appointed as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland. From 2009 to 2013 she was appointed as a Research Biostatistician at QFAB Bioinformatics where she developed an extensive network of collaborations with academic, government, and industry sectors and a multidisciplinary approach to her research.

In 2014 Dr Lê Cao was hired at the biomedical research UQ Diamantina Institute and in 2015 was awarded an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship. In 2017, she joined the University of Melbourne, as a Senior Lecturer at the School of Mathematics and Statistics, and the Centre for Systems Genomics that hosts biology-focussed researchers with strong statistical/computational skills.

Dr Kim-Anh Lê Cao is an expert in multivariate statistical methods and develops novel methods for ‘omics data integration. Since 2009, her team has been working on developing the R toolkit mixOmics dedicated to the integrative analysis of `omics’ data to help researchers mine and make sense of biological data (http://www.mixOmics.org).

Adam Hill PhD

Adam Hill PhD

Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Adam received his PhD from Imperial College, joining the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute in 2005 as part of the Mark Cowley Lidwill Research Program in Cardiac Electrophysiology. In 2011 he founded the Computational Cardiology Research Group of which he is now leader. He is also a conjoint Senior Lecturer at St. Vincent’s Clinical School, University of New South Wales.
Adam’s work has received competitive national funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the National Heart Foundation of Australian (NHFA) as well as international funding from the Safety Pharmacology Society and Health Research Council (NZ). In the past few years Adam has been invited to deliver lectures at major international meetings including the CiPA workshop (Toronto, Canada, 2017), Biophysical Society (New Orleans, US, 2017), Safety Pharmacology Society (Vancouver, Canada, 2016), Cardiac Physiome (Auckland, NZ, 2016), International Society for Nephrology (Melbourne, 2016), Ion Channel Retreat (Vancouver, Canada, 2015) and the Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (Melbourne, 2015). Over the same period his work has been published in top tier journals including Cell, Nature Communications, and Nature Structural and Molecular Biology. His work on drug binding to hERG K+ channels, the major cause of drug induced cardiac arrhythmias, resulted in his invitation to sit on the international committee advising the US FDA and Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) on the development of a comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmia assay (CiPA initiative), the biggest change to preclinical drug screening regulation in generations. He has also filed four patents related to new computational techniques and algorithms for prediction of arrhythmia from patient ECGs. Adam is vice president of the Australian Society for Biophysics, council member of the International Society for Heart Research, and member of Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, The Biophysical Society (USA), and the Australian Physiological Society.

John O’Sullivan MD PhD

John O’Sullivan MD PhD

Heart Research Institute

Dr John O’Sullivan is a physician-scientist who studies cardiometabolic disease, particularly the nexus of “diabesity” and cardiovascular disease, now based at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, the HRI, and the Charles Perkins Centre. He completed his medical and cardiology training in Ireland, and spent the last 4 years on a postdoctoral fellowship at the Gerszten Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. There, he performed large scale targeted and non-targeted metabolomics profiling on subjects in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), validating findings in unrelated cohorts such as the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDC), the Diabetes Prevention Program, and the Jackson Heart Study. This work led to the identification of a number of novel markers and effectors of cardiometabolic disease. Subsequent work demonstrated the ability of intracellular metabolomics profiling to replicate “human disease in a dish” using iPS cells from FHS patients with specific genetic variants. More recently, John performed GWAS on non-targeted metabolomics data to identify an unknown metabolite associated with CT-defined liver fat, subsequently validated this finding in a biopsy-proven cohort, and then demonstrated the ability of this metabolite to predict future diabetes 12 years ahead of presentation in two unrelated cohorts of differing ethnicity. John’s work has been recognized by a number of Young Investigator Awards at the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association (AHA) (x2), and Irish Cardiac Society; Fellowship of the AHA; a Harvard Medical School Tosteson Award; the NSW Ministerial Award for Rising Starts in Cardiovascular Research 2016; in addition to other awards at the European Society of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Irish Cardiac Society. He was recently awarded a Sydney Medical School Foundation Chapman Fellowship. He is keen to expand on this work here in Australia by fostering meaningful and long-lasting collaborations.

Emily Banks MBBS BMedSci PhD FAFPHM

Emily Banks MBBS BMedSci PhD FAFPHM

ANU College of Medicine

Professor Emily Banks is a public health physician and epidemiologist with interest and expertise in chronic disease, large scale cohort studies, pharmacoepidemiology, Aboriginal Health and healthy ageing. She has over 250 publications in peer-reviewed journals. She currently leads the Epidemiology for Policy and Practice Group at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University and is Scientific Director of the 45 and Up Study at the Sax Institute. She has previously served as Chair of the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Medicines and the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Vaccines, as well as working at the University of Oxford. The main emphasis of her work has been in using large-scale data to identify potentially modifiable factors affecting individual and population health in different settings and to quantify their effects, to inform improvements in health and health care.

John Mattick AO FAA FAHMS HonFRCPA

John Mattick AO FAA FAHMS HonFRCPA

The Garvan Institute of Medical Research

John Mattick is the Executive Director of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research. He obtained his BSc with First Class Honours from the University of Sydney and his PhD from Monash University. He undertook his postdoctoral training at Baylor College of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston and then joined the CSIRO Division of Molecular Biology in Sydney where he developed one of the first genetically engineered vaccines. In 1988 he was appointed the Foundation Professor of Molecular Biology at the University of Queensland, where he was also Foundation Director of the ARC Special Research Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, the Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Australian Genome Research Facility, as well as ARC Federation Fellow and NHMRC Australia Fellow.

Professor Mattick’s honours and awards include the inaugural Gutenberg Professorship of the University of Strasbourg, the Order of Australia and Australian Government Centenary Medal, Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Health & Medical Sciences, Honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, the International Union of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (IUBMB) Medal, the Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) Chen Award for Distinguished Achievement in Human Genetic & Genomic Research, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Bertner Memorial Award for Distinguished Contributions to Cancer Research, and the Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) Lemberg Medal.

Since moving to the Garvan in 2012 he has overseen the development of one of the world’s largest human genome sequencing centres and one of the word’s first clinically accredited genome analysis enterprises, Genome.One. He was named by NHMRC as the one of the all-time high achievers in Australian health and medical research.

Gordon Wallace AO FAA FTSE FIOP FRACI

Gordon Wallace AO FAA FTSE FIOP FRACI

ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong

Professor Gordon Wallace is involved in the design and discovery of new materials for use in Energy and Health. In the Health area this involves using new materials to develop biocommunications from the molecular to skeletal domains in order to improve human performance. In the Energy area this involves use of new materials to transform and to store energy, including novel wearable and implantable energy systems for the use in Medical technologies.
He is committed to fundamental research and the translation of fundamental discoveries into practical applications. He is a passionate communicator, dedicated to explaining scientific advances to all in the community from the lay person to the specialist.
He was appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia 26 January 2017.
He received Wollongong’s award for Innovation in 2017 and served as Wollongong’s Australia Day Ambassador.
He received the Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science and Innovation in 2016.
He was appointed to the Prime Ministers Knowledge Nation 100 in 2015.
Gordon is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE), Institute of Physics, and Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI). He is a corresponding member of the Academy of Science in Bologna.
He has published more than 850 refereed publications that have attracted in excess of 30,000 citations; a monograph (3rd Edition published in 2009) on Conductive Electroactive Polymers: Intelligent Polymer Systems and co-authored a monograph on Organic Bionics (published 2012). He has recently co-authored an eBook on 3D BioPrinting He led the presentation of a MOOC on 3D Bioprinting on the FutureLearn platform.
Gordon has supervised almost 100 PhD students to completion and has mentored more than 50 research fellows.
He completed his undergraduate (1979) and PhD (1983) degrees at Deakin University and was awarded a DSc from Deakin University in 2000. He was appointed as a Professor at the University of Wollongong in 1990. He was awarded an ARC Professorial Fellowship in 2002; an ARC Federation Fellowship in 2006 and ARC Laureate Fellowship in 2011.
His other passions include Soccer, Australian Football League (Geelong Football Club) and Music.

Zeeshan Syed PhD

Zeeshan Syed PhD

Stanford University School of Medicine

Zeeshan Syed is the Inaugural Director of the Clinical Inference and Algorithms Program at Stanford Health Care and a Clinical Associate Professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Before joining Stanford in 2016, Dr. Syed was an Associate Professor with Tenure in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, where he was a Principal Investigator for the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and led the Computational Biomarker Discovery and Clinical Inference Group. Dr. Syed received SB and MEng degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and a PhD through a joint program between MIT’s School of Engineering and Harvard Medical School in Computer Science and Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Syed’s research investigates the design and application of advanced healthcare-specialized machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies for clinical effectiveness, high-value care and population health, and has featured at top machine learning and artificial intelligence conferences (NIPS, ICML, AAAI, KDD) as well as in the media (Wired, CBS, NPR, WSJ, Technology Review, ZDNet). Dr. Syed is the recipient of multiple national awards for his scholarship activities, including the prestigious CAREER award from the National Science Foundation. Dr. Syed is also actively engaged with the healthcare analytics industry, having been part of the core early-stage team for the Google[X] Life Sciences initiative (now Verily) and as a founder of HEALTH[at]SCALE Technologies.

Teresa Anderson PhD

Teresa Anderson PhD

Sydney Local Health District

Dr Teresa Anderson has worked in the NSW public health system for more than 30 years. She is Chief Executive of Sydney Local Health District, providing services to more than 600,000 people in Sydney and beyond. Dr Anderson has extensive experience as a clinician, manager and health service leader. She has held positions as the Director, Clinical Operations, Sydney South West Area Health Service, General Manager, Liverpool Hospital and Director of Community and Allied Health Services for the Liverpool Health Service.

She serves on the boards of the Ingham Institute, Centenary Institute, Heart Research Institute, ANZAC Research Institute and Healthshare, and is also the Chair of the Sydney Research Council.

Dr Anderson is focused on supporting collaboration and building partnerships to provide excellent health care. She is widely acknowledged for supporting and mentoring her staff in fostering new ideas to drive efficiencies and best practice.

Rajesh Subbiah BSc (Med) MBBS FRACP PhD

Rajesh Subbiah BSc (Med) MBBS FRACP PhD

St Vincent's Hospital

Rajesh Subbiah is the Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology and Pacing at St Vincent’s Hospital, Faculty member of the Electrophysiology and Biophysics Program at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, and is an Associate Professor of Medicine at University of New South Wales. He is also Deputy Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Cardiac Device Advisory and Complications Committee for the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Clinical interests include catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia as well as cardiac device therapy. He has published widely at both a clinical, basic science and translational level. Current research interests include exploring the molecular mechanisms of ion channel mediated cardiac disease, developing translational models of cardiac arrhythmias and clinical arrhythmia and device management.

Nalini Pather BMedSci MMedSci GCULT PhD

Nalini Pather BMedSci MMedSci GCULT PhD

EPICentre, UNSW

Nalini is the Co-Director of UNSW EPICentre and the Group Leader of the Technology in Practice research group. She completed her PhD (2009) in South Africa and has extensive experience teaching into medicine and health science programs in a number of countries, including North America and the UK. Nalini currently teaches in the UNSW Medicine programme as well as to Exercise Physiology, Biomedical Engineering and Medical Science students.

Nalini is known internationally as an innovator in higher education and is well-respected for developing collaborative learning communities that engage colleagues and students in the strategic use of technology, and embedding practices such as team work, professionalism, online assessment and ePortfolios in higher education. She has won several teaching awards for successfully enhancing student learning and for developing staff capacity.

Joanna Batstone PhD

Joanna Batstone PhD

IBM Research – Australia

Joanna L. Batstone, Ph.D., is the Vice President and Lab Director, IBM Research – Australia and Chief Technology Officer, IBM Australia and New Zealand. Previously she was Vice President, Architecture & Technical Solution Design, IBM Global Technology Services, Ireland, and Director for Distributed Computing in IBM Research – Watson, with worldwide strategy responsibility for Distributed Computing. Her IBM career has included a variety of technical and business leadership roles across different IBM Lines of Business, including Healthcare & Life Sciences, Sensors & Actuators, Physical Sciences and Application and Integration Middleware. Joanna joined IBM in the T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY.

Joanna has published over 80 papers and organized many industry conference symposia. She received a B.Sc., in Chemical Physics and a Ph.D., in Physics from The University of Bristol, UK, followed by postdoctoral work at AT&T Bell Laboratories, NJ, and a Lectureship in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Liverpool, UK, before joining IBM Research. She received the ’95 Burton Medal from the Microscopy Society of America, the ’91 Robert Lansing Hardy Gold Medal from The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society and the ’89 Cosslett Award from the Microbeam Analysis Society.

Joshua Ho PhD

Joshua Ho PhD

Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Dr Joshua Ho is the Head of Bioinformatics and Systems Medicine Laboratory at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute. He holds an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship and a Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship. He is also a conjoint Senior Lecturer at UNSW Sydney. Dr Ho completed his BSc (Hon 1, Medal) and PhD in Bioinformatics at the University of Sydney, and undertook postdoctoral research at the Harvard Medical School in the USA.

His current research focuses on developing fast and reliable bioinformatics methods to identify the genetic cause and mechanism of inherited heart diseases, using a range of approaches such as whole genome sequencing, single-cell RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, machine learning, systems biology, cloud computing, and software testing and quality assurance.

His research excellence has been recognised by the 2015 NSW Ministerial Award for Rising Star in Cardiovascular Research, the 2015 Australian Epigenetics Alliance’ Illumina Early Career Research Award, and the 2016 Young Tall Poppy Science Award.

Svetha Venkatesh PhD

Svetha Venkatesh PhD

Centre for Pattern Recognition and Data Analytics, Deakin University

Svetha Venkatesh is an Australian Laureate Fellow, an Alfred Deakin Professor and Director of Centre for Pattern Recognition and Data Analytics (PRaDA) at Deakin University. She was elected a Fellow of the International Association of Pattern Recognition in 2004 for contributions to formulation and extraction of semantics in multimedia data, and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in 2006. In 2017 Professor Venkatesh was appointed an Australian Laureate Fellow, the highest individual award the Australian Research Council can bestow.
Professor Venkatesh and her team have tackled a wide range of problems of societal significance, including the critical areas of autism, security and aged care. The outcomes have impacted the community and evolved into publications, patents, tools and spin-off companies. This includes 554 publications, 3 full patents, 3 start-up companies (iCetana.com, Virtual Observer.com, iHosp) and a significant product (TOBY Playpad).
Professor Venkatesh has tackled complex pattern recognition tasks by drawing inspiration and models from widely diverse disciplines, integrating them into rigorous computational models and innovative algorithms. Her main contributions have been in the development of theoretical frameworks and novel applications for analyzing large scale, multimedia data. This includes development of several Bayesian parametric and non-parametric models, solving fundamental problems in processing multiple channel, multi-modal temporal and spatial data.

Edwina Wing-Lun BSc MBBS FRACP

Edwina Wing-Lun BSc MBBS FRACP

St Vincents Hospital Sydney

Edwina Wing-Lun is a junior cardiologist, undertaking subspecialty training in Interventional Cardiology at St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney. She has worked in a number of locations throughout her training, including St Vincent’s, Bankstown, Gosford and Wyong, Campbelltown, Wagga Wagga and Condobolin; and been involved in both clinical and basic science research at the Garvan and Victor Chang Institutes. Edwina has many interests including coronary artery disease and structural heart intervention but also enjoys clinical medicine, particularly in rural and remote settings. She teaches at the Universities of Notre Dame and New South Wales and sits on the roundtable for Women and Heart Disease with the National Heart Foundation and is an avid supporter for gender equality within medicine, for patients and within the workplace.